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Uber's Security Breach - Hackers Are Exploiting Users With A Phishing Email

By Kachi Ojieh Friday, November 24, 2017
uber car
57 million drivers and users are really having a bad time with Uber's recently uncovered security breach which resulted from a hack. Not to put you on tension – what the hackers got away with was merely names, email addresses, and phone numbers although the way Uber is treating it is the issue at hand.

Despite the fact that the hack occurred in 2016, Uber still hasn't reached the users whose information was stolen, and hackers are now capitalizing on that.

Dale Meredith, an IT Trainer and security consultant shared an email he got on twitter. The email which is intended to exploit users looks like it originated from Uber, however with a special trick – it’s created like the conventional email which companies sends to users to apologize after an information breach.

The letter begins in this tone “Our deepest apologies…” and further says “You may have heard that Uber was compromised last year. We are sorry to inform you that your information was, unfortunately, confirmed to be part of the breach. Please click below to confirm you’ve received this message and change your password.”

Anyways, if users click on the link contained in the message, a page is opened with input box for them to enter their old password and new passwords. The danger lies when the hackers get the needed credentials and goes straight to access the user’s Uber account. A terrible practice by most internet users is that they reuse a single username and password across different websites, which simply means that the hackers can now have access to their Facebook, Twitter, Bank Accounts etc and quickly change the user login details too.

This is a wakeup call for people who are fond of clicking on links found in security emails rather than making use of the verified app provided by the company to tread cautiously. Uber has to fix this mess quickly.
uber car
57 million drivers and users are really having a bad time with Uber's recently uncovered security breach which resulted from a hack. Not to put you on tension – what the hackers got away with was merely names, email addresses, and phone numbers although the way Uber is treating it is the issue at hand.

Despite the fact that the hack occurred in 2016, Uber still hasn't reached the users whose information was stolen, and hackers are now capitalizing on that.

Dale Meredith, an IT Trainer and security consultant shared an email he got on twitter. The email which is intended to exploit users looks like it originated from Uber, however with a special trick – it’s created like the conventional email which companies sends to users to apologize after an information breach.

The letter begins in this tone “Our deepest apologies…” and further says “You may have heard that Uber was compromised last year. We are sorry to inform you that your information was, unfortunately, confirmed to be part of the breach. Please click below to confirm you’ve received this message and change your password.”

Anyways, if users click on the link contained in the message, a page is opened with input box for them to enter their old password and new passwords. The danger lies when the hackers get the needed credentials and goes straight to access the user’s Uber account. A terrible practice by most internet users is that they reuse a single username and password across different websites, which simply means that the hackers can now have access to their Facebook, Twitter, Bank Accounts etc and quickly change the user login details too.

This is a wakeup call for people who are fond of clicking on links found in security emails rather than making use of the verified app provided by the company to tread cautiously. Uber has to fix this mess quickly.

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Kachi Ojieh
Kachi Ojieh

"Tech Is Before Anything Else since 2017". Kachi Ojieh is the CEO and Founder of Tech Is Bae. An enthusiastic blogger with the heart to unify all tech lovers across the globe. Currently working to make sure readers keep coming back for more.

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